The ocean not only consists of water, but Salmon… mmmm. Thank you Ocean.

By March 15, 2017 Recipes No Comments
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ashley-vangel

By: Ashley Vangel

You’ve probably been wondering when I was going to start talking about the health benefits of fish. Well, you’re in luck! The next two weeks will be dedicated to a couple of the most nutritious oceanic fish around. This week, let’s chat about the one and only, salmon! Especially when salmon is wild-caught and not farmed, salmon is one of the most nutritious foods around.
 

Salmon is most well known for it’s heart health benefits. A serving of salmon has one of the highest omega-3 fatty acid contents. Eating salmon on a regular basis has been shown, not only to help reduce inflammation and decrease triglyceride levels, but also to reduce the risk of developing such conditions as atherosclerosis (clogged arteries), hypertension (high blood pressure), and stroke. The american heart association recommends eating fish, particularly fatty fish like salmon, at least twice per week. Each serving is about 3.5 ounces of cooked fish or about ¾ of a cup of flaked fish.
 

Salmon also has so many vitamins and minerals. One serving of salmon contains more than juice one day’s worth of vitamin D. Eating salmon on a regular basis can help prevent vitamin D deficiency, especially in the winter months when it can be difficult to get enough vitamin D from the sun’s rays. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to health problems, like cancer, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and heart disease. In addition, the vitamin A, vitamin D, and selenium in salmon help to protect the nervous system from age-related damaged
 

Aside from all of these wonderful micronutrients that salmon offers us, we can’t forget that salmon is also a good source of protein! In just one serving, salmon has about 35 grams of protein.
 

The term “wild caught” has a bit of a grey area. Some “wild-caught” seafood actually starts it’s life in a hatchery and then it is released into the wild to be caught. Basically, just because the package says “wild-caught” doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s good for you. Keep your eye out for true Alaskan wild-caught salmon. It’s not only cost effective and more likely to be truly caught in the wild, it is also one of the least contaminated species.
 

Try baking, grilling or broiling your salmon as opposed to frying it for a healthy meal preparation. Maybe try to make a salmon patty instead of a hamburger. There are so many ways to prepare salmon that are super healthy and delicious. There’s definitely a recipe out there that will satisfy every taste and preference.
 

Now the question is, should you cook salmon at home? Or… should you wait to see if Action Bronson will take a break from his performance and help guide you towards the meanest salmon meal in Austin at this year’s SXSW Stubb’s BBQ event with Rachael Ray… you’ll find me at Stubb’s!
 

How do you like to cook your salmon? Let us know by leaving a comment in the section below.
 

Ashley is a registered dietitian and a licensed dietitian in the state of Texas. She graduated from Framingham State University, majoring in nutrition and dietetics and she completed her dietetic internship at the University of Connecticut. (more)

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