Eggs are rich in Omega-3 AND Vitamins

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By: Ashley Vangel

When you think about your favorite breakfast meal, what food do you most think of? Omelette? Frittata? Scrambled EGGS?! …Brunch anyone? Eggs are usually the centerpiece around a phenomenal breakfast meal.
 

Good news! Eggs are actually a super healthy food! AND they not only make for a great breakfast, but they also make a mean breakfast-for-dinner meal. First of all, most everyone knows eggs are a very good source of protein. Eggs offer us all eight of the essential amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. Basically, the word “essential” indicates that these are the amino acids that our bodies can’t make themselves, so we must obtain them from our diet. The white part of the egg contains more than half of the protein found in the whole egg. Eating eggs for breakfast has been found to be great for weight loss because their high quality protein helps to keep us feeling full longer. However don’t be too quick to order only the egg white omelette just yet. The yolk is also super rich in nutrients.
 

The egg yolks are rich in some wonderful vitamins, like vitamins A, D, E, and K. These vitamins are needed for a healthy immune system, eyesight, and the regular functioning of our body’s cells in the brain, nervous system, memory, and metabolism. I mentioned in a previous post that mushrooms are one of the sole plant sources of vitamin D. Well, not only can you get your vitamin D from shrooms and the sun’s rays, you can also get your vitamin D fix by eating some eggs, too. Vitamin D is important to help protect our bones, preventing such conditions like osteoporosis and rickets. Some more good news! If your doctor tells you to eat more iron-rich foods, like red meat, you can tell him that you’ll also eat more eggs. Eggs, particularly in the egg yolk, are also a good source of iron.
 

Some brands of eggs now even contain omega-3 fats. This really depends on what the chicken has been fed. The egg carton should let you know if the eggs contain any omega-3’s. Omega-3 fatty acids help with the maintenance of brain function and normal vision. I’m sure you’re used to hearing about how oily fish, like salmon and tuna, contain these fats, but don’t look past the eggs when your doctor tells you to get more omega-3 in your diet!
 

Did I mention eggs are also super inexpensive. They also last in the fridge for quite some time. Here’s a tip to find out if your eggs are fresh enough to crack open. A fresh egg will sink in water and a stale one (aka an egg you don’t want to eat) will float.
 

So whether you’re enjoying eggs for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, let us know how you’re making them! What’s your favorite egg dish? Leave us a comment in the section below!
 

Ashley is a registered dietitian and a licensed dietitian in the state of Texas. She graduated from Framingham State University, majoring in nutrition and dietetics and she completed her dietetic internship at the University of Connecticut. (more)

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